I’m taking a little break from Spark or Swap this week to focus on Fashion Revolution Week which runs from April 18 – 24th.  I’ve talked about fast fashion before and sustainability and mindfulness when it comes to our closets, and this week, I’m hoping even more people will realize the value of secondhand shopping!  Not only is it stylish, it’s the cheapest and easiest way to opt out of the fast fashion cycle.  Hence this week’s Tuesday Try was to NOT wear fast fashion.  For one day, I challenged people to wear homemade, secondhand, made in Canada/US or made ethically/sustainably.  For one day.  If you can’t go without fast fashion for one day, it’s time to pay attention to Fashion Revolution and Fashion Revolution Canada and watch The True Cost movie on Netflix, then go thrifting or make something or shop local.  There are so many options, it’s basically inexcusable NOT to do something.

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As Alberta Ambassador, Claire Theaker-Brown, says, Fashion Revolution Week is not about declaring brands “good” or “bad” but rather about showing we care about the people behind our clothes.  I chose to wear this skirt because not only is it thrifted, it’s also handmade…

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IMG_0669This week I’m in Banff, Alberta, all week attending the national CAOT Conference, but I’ll be promoting ethical fashion in all my spare time and I have a special project planned – I’m curious to see if any of my 650 colleagues will notice…  I will report back on Friday!

IMG_0678 IMG_0672Meanwhile, any day is a good day to join the Revolution, so if you didn’t do the Tuesday Try today, no problem!  Any and every day you wear slow fashion is better than nothing.  Keep asking, #whomademyclothes.

If not for me, ask for the next generation, for cute kids/photographers like mine who photo bomb in their thrifted outfit and will end up paying the price for fast fashion ignorance... unless we start acting, now.
If not for me, ask for the next generation, for cute kids/photographers/photo-bombers like mine who will end up paying the price for fast fashion ignorance… unless we start acting, now.

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